Microgreens: An Even Healthier Form of Vegetables?

Photo from Morguefile
I'm always on the lookout for nutrition advice and compelling stats. When I ran across the latest post from National Public Radio's food blog, the SALT, I was captivated.

Greenhouse growers are creating nutrient-dense leafy vegetables dubbed "microgreens". Imagine alfalfa sprout-looking versions of herbs, lettuces, cabbages, peas, beets and even radishes. Supposedly the two-week old microgreens can contain up to four to six times the nutrients of their mature, adult counterparts. Wow!

I think these tender greens sound like the perfect way to top a robust salad or add some greens to a sandwich. Have you ever heard of or tried microgreens? I know I'll be watching my local farmer's market and grocery stores for these vitamin-packed veggies.

Check out NPR's article, "Introducing Microgreens: Younger, And Maybe More Nutritious, Vegetables" for more details.

Until Next Time,
Choose Healthy!

Angela Tague
Whole Foods Living

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Adventures in Homemade Ginger Tea

I'm cupping my hands around my first ever cup of homemade ginger tea. I know, I know. Why has it taken me so long to experiment with using fresh ginger root in the kitchen? I'm not sure.
Fresh ginger root. Photo Credit: Morguefile

In the past my experience with ginger has been pretty neutral. I like ginger ale soda, but it's masked with lots of sugar and bubbly carbonation. Candied ginger tastes too spicy. And, Asian foods seasoned with the spicy root have been tasty, but not exactly memorable. I guess I'm neutral about ginger.

Then a friend over on Google+ talked me into giving fresh, whole ginger a chance. He uses it to make gingered-spiced quinoa and homemade stock for future soup recipes. (Hi, Dana!)

So, as I push through today's work deadline and succumb to every possible distraction around me, I ventured into the kitchen to do something with that ugly little ginger root I just bought. It's just laying there all knotted and bland looking.

Since I'm not feeling the greatest today (darn nausea and joint pain from RA), I decided to venture into an easy creation: ginger tea. Since I know I like chamomile, I decided to add it to my impromptu recipe.

I filled my decorative little glass tea pot with cold water, 10 dried chamomile buds and approximately 10 disks of sliced ginger that resemble dimes. After simmering for 10 minutes, I put about 1 tablespoon of raw honey in my favorite mug and topped it off with the steamy golden tea.

The first sip was spicy and tickled my throat. I can't decide if I like it. But, I keep going back for more sips. The sweet and spicy combination is definitely an acquired taste, and growing on me quickly. I can see the bottom of my cup. I better go grab a refill!

How to you enjoy fresh ginger?

Until Next Time,
Choose Healthy!

Angela Tague
Whole Foods Living

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Eating the Rainbow

I have a weird, daily obsession. I try to eat a rainbow of fresh produce as often as possible.

Ready for the oven!
It's a particularly good day if I can create a single meal that looks like a colorful abstract painting. Two of my go-to whole foods rainbow dishes are roasted vegetables over brown rice and homemade veggie pizza.

Here is a cellphone picture of one of my latest rainbow pizzas. This pizza is topped with red tomatoes, orange and yellow sweet bell peppers, green spinach, purple onion, white mushrooms and slices of mozzarella cheese. Are you drooling yet?

How do you add color to your meals? Do you ever strive to eat the rainbow in a single meal? Please tell me I'm not crazy!

Until Next Time,
Choose Healthy!

Angela Tague
Whole Foods Living

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